Archie Comics

Comics are a touchy subject with parents. Kids love them; parents view them as beneath the reading level/intellect of their child.

A word to you, parents: never worry about your child’s reading level, so long as they are reading. I’m not saying don’t push or encourage them, but if they enjoy reading comics, don’t freak out. Comics are still valuable in their own way.

I believe this comic-hatred is a throwback to the parents of the 50s. My father wasn’t allowed comics as a child; one time his parents found a collection he’d borrowed from a friend under his bed and threw them out despite his panicked protests (no word on if the friendship survived that incident). While the standards were relaxed for my sister and I, I do not think my dad loved us reading comics; in his mind we could do better, and we were pushing ourselves enough. Mostly because we looooved Archie comics. Well, I say we but it was mostly me, myself, and I. Every time we went to the grocery store I would grab a new one and beg my parents to buy it for me.

For being the worlds oldest teenager, Archie still speaks well to a young audience. The core five (Archie, Betty, Veronica, Reggie and Jughead) each represent a general stereotype; you’ll always find someone to associate with.

I couldn’t tell you why I loved these comics so much as a kid. Probably because they were short, sometimes funny, occasionally touching or education. When you’re young, short little tidbits will help hold your attention longer then a well-thought, lush and beautifully executed plot. Sad but true.

When it was new (to me), I don’t think Archie comics set out to be multicultural or educational. It’s largely Caucasian-centric (just look at the main group), with a less then 3 African-American supporting characters (or other nationality). The vocabulary was largely easy-access, and the stories focused on comedy. In recent years, however, Archie Comics has made a change towards consciously inserting a new vocabulary word per book as well as inserting a larger multicultural cast. A good idea, to be sure, but the characters are entirely superfluous; there are so many of them that they cannot be characters on their own.

While each character has a basic personality, there was no consistency from story to story. In one, Veronica can be a rich kid with a heart of gold, willing to share and just wanting to be loved; in another she can be cold and heartless, out to ruin her best friend. Spread this out over several decades of stories (since Archie comics often reprint stories; in recent times I have not seen a single book that has given me entirely new content) and perhaps hundreds of authors, and you understand the inconsistency. It does make it hard for the children to follow, howver.

These comics are a good idea for younger children. Whatever you think about comics, Archie is a great introduction. It can innocently teach your child vocabulary and other important lessons while entertaining them at the same time. Don’t go overboard; try to find them at old fairs or yard sales, since they are expensive. I found that I outgrew them in my teens, but they were still a large and valuable part of my childhood, and certainly contributed to my reading ability later in life.

Suggested for ages 6+

Eyeshield 21

Written by Riichiro Inagaki, Illustrated by Yusuke Murata

Eyeshield 21 is a multi-volume saga in manga (comic) form. Specifically, Eyeshield 21 deals with American Football, a sport that does garners about as much enthusiasm and understanding in Japan as it does among North American women.

The hero is bullied Sena Kobayakawa, a tiny, blindingly fast boy whose idea of success is just being accepted to high school. Tricked/bullied into joining the two-man American Football team by the demonic Hiruma, Sena becomes the star of the team with his lightning-fast reflexes and speed.

The pace of the story is excellent, as is the character development is exquisite; and all of it built around the development of an underdog football team.

Suggested Ages: 12+

Inagaki, R., & Murata, Y. (2005) Eyeshield 21: Volume 1. Viz Media LLC.

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Babymouse #2: Our Hero

By Jennifer L. Holm & Matt Holm

Babymouse. Was anything ever to clearly marketed towards little girls? Okay, beside Barbie. Babymouse is an amalgamation of everything little girls want to be, and everything little girls are. Babymouse is a big sister, a big dreamer, forgetful, sarcastic, and deadly enemies with Felicia Furrypaws. And in this installment of her ongoing adventures, Babymouse must find it in herself to be courageous as she faces off against her aggressors and counters her biggest fear – dodgeball!

The artwork is unique. It seems messy and done quickly, but it works. Mostly done in black and white, the comic bleeds into shades of pink when Babymouse enters one of her many, many daydreams. It’s the fantasies – so out of place and extravagant as to be hilarious – that gives Babymouse its unique charm.

Babymouse is sassy, relevant, and silly enough to appeal to the elementary school set and help encourage reading.

Suggested Ages: 6-9

Holm, J., & Holm, M. (2006). Babymouse: Our Hero. Random House. More

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